Put This “ONE Thing” Goal-Setting Strategy To Work In 2024

Key Takeaways:

– Goal setting to the now allows you to work backward from your long-term goals and determine what actions you can take today to achieve them.
– The concept of goal setting to the now is based on the idea of beginning with the end in mind, as suggested by Dr. Stephen R. Covey.
– Being appropriate in the moment is a valuable social skill that can also be applied to goal setting and achievement.
– Extraordinary goals often take time to achieve, making it difficult to know how to behave today to align with those goals.
– Goal setting to the now involves reverse planning in seven steps, starting with a someday goal and working backward to determine what needs to be achieved in five years, one year, one month, one week, and today.
– Setting annual goals is important, but they should be milestones on your ultimate journey toward your someday goal.
– By using goal setting to the now, you can ensure that your efforts are directed toward something bigger and more rewarding in the long run.
– Jay Papasan is the bestselling co-author of The Millionaire Real Estate Agent, SHIFT, and The ONE Thing. He currently serves as the Vice President of Strategic Content at Keller Williams Realty, Inc.

inman:

“The ONE Thing” author Jay Papasan says goal setting to the now allows you to work backward from your long-term goals and figure out what you can do today to make them a reality.

This January marks Inman’s fifth annual Agent Appreciation Month, which culminates at Inman Connect New York in a celebration of agents at the end of January. Plus, we’re rolling out the coveted Inman Power Player Awards, as well as the New York Power Brokers and MLS Innovators awards.

“Begin with the end in mind,” Dr. Stephen R. Covey said.

When our kids were in preschool, I remember getting a bulletin from the director to the parents. Written on an old-school typewriter and photocopied, the headline read: “Poopyhead.” Yeah, it got my attention. 

The director had received some concerned notes from parents about the fact that he allowed the kids to call him “Poopyhead.” He noted that adults learn how to be appropriate in context. We know to be more formal at work, at church, at a fancy restaurant or meeting new prospective in-laws.

In other contexts, we get to be more casual and cut loose. He felt part of the job was to help the kids learn contextual behavior. While he allowed the Rated-G potty language, the other instructors did not. The kids had figured it out quickly. They were learning to be appropriate in the moment.

Being “appropriate in the moment” is a wonderful social skill. And it is even more appropriate for goal setting and achievement. The challenge with extraordinary goals is two-fold. They often take many years to achieve and, as a result, people struggle to know how to behave today to be in alignment with that distant goal. 

Say you’d like to be the top producer in your market. You just crossed the $500,000 gross commission income (GCI) mark and the number one agent is doing $3 million in GCI. That’s a big gap. It will take years to get your business to $3 million in GCI and, by then, the top producer could have grown as well.

You can plot out the math in a spreadsheet, but how are you supposed to behave this week? That’s where goal setting to the now comes in. 

As we wrote in The ONE Thing, goal setting to the now (GSTTN) is the practical answer to Dr. Covey’s call to “begin with the end in mind.” It’s reverse planning in seven steps. 

You start with a someday goal, grounded in your purpose and values. The key is to think “extraordinary.” I want to be No. 1 in my market, a best-selling author or play Carnegie Hall.

Next, ask the question, “What’s the one thing I would have to achieve in five years to be on track for my someday goal?” That answer becomes your five-year goal. 

Here’s the key. Your one-year goal isn’t based on your someday one, it’s based on your five-year goal. You’re working backward to the present. “What’s the one thing I would have to achieve in one year to be on track for my five-year goals?” That answer becomes your target for the next 12 months.

Based on your one-year goal, you ask what you need to achieve this month. That goal becomes the basis for your aim this week. Your goal for the week informs what you must achieve today. And each day, you can ask what’s your one thing right now.

Although your five-year goal may be the stuff of crystal balls, each step you take should get progressively clearer about the priority. Having lived this for many years, I can share that each year you will get increasingly clear on your distant five-year objective. GSTTN allows you to be appropriate in the moment and paints the straightest possible path to your extraordinary someday goal. 

Setting annual goals is great. The problem is, you may not be working backward from something meaningful. You’re prone to chasing the low-hanging fruit. And those quick wins may be leading you in the opposite direction from your ultimate destination.

With GSTTN, your annual goals become milestones on your ultimate journey. You may not achieve 100 percent of the goal, but you move forward with absolute certainty that you’re going in the right direction.

This January, take a moment to examine your 2024 goals. Where are they leading you? Can you direct your efforts toward something bigger and ultimately more rewarding? 

One question to ponder in your thinking time: Do my annual goals reflect the opportunity of the moment or a milestone on a bigger journey?

Jay Papasan is the bestselling co-author of The Millionaire Real Estate Agent, SHIFT, and The ONE Thing. He currently serves as the Vice President of Strategic Content at Keller Williams Realty, Inc.


Source link

Property Chomp's Take:

Goal setting is a crucial aspect of achieving success in any area of life. Whether it's in our personal relationships, our careers, or our health and fitness, setting goals helps us stay focused and motivated. However, setting long-term goals can often feel overwhelming, especially when the path to achieving them seems uncertain. That's where the concept of goal setting to the now comes in.

In his book "The ONE Thing," author Jay Papasan emphasizes the importance of goal setting to the now. He suggests that by working backward from our long-term goals, we can figure out what actions we need to take today to make them a reality. This approach allows us to break down our goals into smaller, more manageable steps, making it easier to stay on track and measure our progress.

To understand the concept of goal setting to the now, let's consider an example. Imagine you want to become the top producer in your market. Currently, you have crossed the $500,000 gross commission income (GCI) mark, but the number one agent in your market is doing $3 million in GCI. The gap between where you are and where you want to be is significant, and it may take several years to reach that level.

Instead of feeling overwhelmed by the distance between your current situation and your long-term goal, goal setting to the now encourages you to focus on what you can do today to move closer to that goal. By working backward, you can determine what you need to achieve in five years to be on track for your someday goal. This becomes your five-year goal. Then, you break it down further by determining what you need to achieve in one year to be on track for your five-year goal. This becomes your target for the next 12 months. From there, you can set monthly, weekly, and even daily goals that align with your long-term vision.

The beauty of goal setting to the now is that it allows you to be appropriate in the moment. It helps you navigate the challenges of working towards extraordinary goals by providing a clear path forward. Rather than feeling lost or unsure of how to behave today in order to reach your distant goal, goal setting to the now gives you a framework to make decisions and take action in alignment with your long-term vision.

It's important to note that setting annual goals alone may not always lead you in the right direction. Without the context of a larger journey, you may find yourself chasing short-term wins that don't contribute to your ultimate destination. With goal setting to the now, your annual goals become milestones on your ultimate journey. While you may not achieve 100% of each goal, you can move forward with confidence, knowing that you are heading in the right direction.

As we embark on a new year, it's the perfect time to reflect on our long-term goals and assess whether they are leading us towards something bigger and more rewarding. By adopting the practice of goal setting to the now, we can ensure that our actions today are in alignment with our future aspirations. So, take a moment to examine your goals for the next five years. Are they guiding you towards your extraordinary someday goal? If not, it may be time to readjust your focus and set new targets that will lead you on a path of success.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *